Liszt

Piano, Fortepiano and Harpsichord Music
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fredbucket
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Re: Liszt

Post by fredbucket »

The two editions I have (B&H and Cortot) each have G, not G#.

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Fred
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Ferruccio
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Re: Liszt

Post by Ferruccio »

arneros wrote:Help!

Après une Lecture de Dante:

G or G#?
Thanks.
I play g#. I think, it's obviously a typo.
Best regards, Ferruccio
alfor
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Re: Liszt

Post by alfor »

I completely agree with Busoni's great grandson and plead for g sharp.
ALL editions have g natural; but in my copy of Klindworth's edition, the former owner wrote "gis" in pencil!

The "theme" in question always starts with a characteristic minor second. See bars 108, 112, 130, 293 and 311.
So it's not a case of "variatio delectat", imho.
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Ferruccio
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Re: Liszt

Post by Ferruccio »

alfor wrote:I completely agree with Busoni's great grandson and plead for g sharp.
ALL editions have g natural; but in my copy of Klindworth's edition, the former owner wrote "gis" in pencil!

The "theme" in question always starts with a characteristic minor second. See bars 108, 112, 130, 293 and 311.
So it's not a case of "variatio delectat", imho.
Exactly!
Best regards, Ferruccio
alfor
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Re: Liszt

Post by alfor »

P.S. The Soviet edition (ed. by Milstein a.o.) adds a sharp in brackets and refers to the text commentary...
which I could not find online and which I would not be able to read!
Best regards, Alfor S. Cans

Music is a higher revelation than wisdom and philosophy (Beethoven)


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arneros
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Re: Liszt

Post by arneros »

Thank you all for your cooperation.
R
emma
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Re: Liszt

Post by emma »

Liszt-Tausig-Faust symphony (ms).pdf
From the Liszt Memorial Museum, the manuscript of Tausig's transcription of the Faust symphony.
Unfortunately, the score is hardly readable and gives only a glimpse of Tausig's art of transcription.
To my knowledge, the other transcriptions of this masterwork are by A. Stradal (a little awkward for my taste) and S. Blet (french pianist and composer, his transcription, made in 1994, is very pianistic. It is unfortunately out of print and has never been recorded).
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FW190
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Re: Liszt

Post by FW190 »

La regata veneziana - Notturno (Searle No. 424-2), based on Rossini's Les soirées Musicale No.9 was originally written for Piano 2H in 1837.
Here comes a 2P8H version made by Th. Herbert. The first edition of this transcription was published by Schott, Mainz, in 1888 - with a print run of 300 copies.
Liszt.-.S.424-2.-.Notturno-'La-Regata-Veneziana'-(2P8H-Herbert-Schott-Edition-1888).pdf
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soh choon wee
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Re: Liszt

Post by soh choon wee »

I like to ask a question on Transcendental Etude no 10, appassionata, on the interlocking chords....

Most (i would think all) will play with left hand over right hand......(and the prescribed fingerings)

Question, is this the only solution? Are there alternatives?

Thanks.




(recently, i had a student who somehow find it awkward with conventional fingering.... and find interchanging the hand more manageable........ His hand is quite muscular, and short fingers, not the long slender ones.....)
At low speed, it seems OK, but i am hesitant should i suggest him to adopt the conventional fingering...... i have no idea how it will turn out some months later when he play full speed....
HullandHellandHalifax
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Re: Liszt

Post by HullandHellandHalifax »

Hi soh choon wee,
the short answer is that there are always alternatives. You have said it yourself that your students hand is short and stocky, not the long slender fingers that Liszt had, so what suited him would certainly not suit your student.
With this particular etude I have (retires to naughty step) often played the top notes of those chromatic passages with the right hand and the thirds in the left hand, it makes for a much smoother descent and visually easier to play. I have found the same solution works with the awkward hands over section in the Andante lagrimoso from the "Harmonies". For purists what I have suggested is heresy but as many of the conventions in music printing make for awkward reading of the score I couldn't care less. My only consideration is if my solution makes for a better musical performance of the tricky passage which means I have less fear of the passage and therefore a more assured rendition.
Whatever you decide don't worry about tradition, we are not robots and your solution might just be the key to a better performance.
good luck
Brian
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