Spelling with music notes

Anything musical that will not fit into the above fora
Arjuna
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Spelling with music notes

Post by Arjuna » Wed May 09, 2012 12:58 am

There seems to be a bit of a tradition of writing music based on themes that spell someone's name. I've have come across a number of pieces that use Bb-A-C-B to spell "Bach" and Debussy used B-A-D-D-G to spell "Haydn". I know why Bb=B and B=H, but I'm not so sure about the Y and N in Debussy's Hommage á Joseph Haydn. Is there a system or accepted convention for spelling things with letters other than the first 7 in the alphabet. If not, would anyone like to propose one?
Last edited by Arjuna on Wed May 09, 2012 11:57 pm, edited 1 time in total.

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Re: Spelling with music notes

Post by 4candles » Wed May 09, 2012 9:49 am

I have always wondered the same thing Arjuna as I have wanted to write themes/pieces based on composers' names before.
Would be interested in any scholarly information!

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Re: Spelling with music notes

Post by fredbucket » Wed May 09, 2012 10:06 am

I have a proposal to make, as evidenced by the attached picture.
music notes.jpg
The notes, when deciphered, spell a very important word which I am sure can be, and I believe has been, used as the basis for some quite spectacular music.

Regards
Fred
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Re: Spelling with music notes

Post by Arjuna » Thu May 10, 2012 10:55 am

The word isn't "Gcaefgbcdca" is it?

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Re: Spelling with music notes

Post by fredbucket » Thu May 10, 2012 12:23 pm

Arjuna wrote:The word isn't "Gcaefgbcdca" is it?
Close, but no cigar.

There are obviously seven unique letters in the word, but they are not the first seven letters of the alphabet...

Regards
Fred

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Re: Spelling with music notes

Post by Arjuna » Fri May 11, 2012 2:24 pm

I've got it! It's one of these words right?! http://homepage.ntlworld.com/adam.bozon/Scrabble11.htm

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Re: Spelling with music notes

Post by Arjuna » Sat May 12, 2012 3:27 am

It's too much for me. I'm not clever enough to decipher codes but I have my own suggestion. A phonetic system, based on how letters sound or could sound, and how they are pronounced.
A; vowel, pronounced at the back of the throat (guttural) = a, o, u.
B; consonant, pronounced with lips (labial) = b, m, p, w.
C; (hard as in "can" or "cup") consonant, guttural = c, k, q, x.
- (soft as in "circus") semi-consonant, pronounced at the palate (palatal) = s, z.
D; consonant, pronounced at the teeth (dental) = d, l, t.
E; vowel, pronounced further up the throat = e, i, y, r.
F; semi-consonant, labial, also pronounced with the breath (aspirant) = f, h, v.
G; (soft as in "giant") consonant, palatal = g, j.
- Also nasal as in song = n.

That should cover the whole alphabet with a reasonably even spread. I guess sharps and flats could be used if the sounds are "sharper' or "flater", e.g. X = C#, or O = Ab

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Re: Spelling with music notes

Post by fredbucket » Sat May 12, 2012 11:05 am

Arjuna wrote:I've got it! It's one of these words right?! http://homepage.ntlworld.com/adam.bozon/Scrabble11.htm
No, I'm afraid not.

As a clue, the seven letters in the word were aranged in alphabetical order. The first was assigned to A, the second to B .... and the last to G. The notes then spell the word.

That may help a bit...

Regards
Fred

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Re: Spelling with music notes

Post by Timtin » Fri Jun 15, 2012 7:21 pm

Going off at a tangent slightly from the above discussion,
I wonder if anyone has ever invented a music system which
consists of the notes a,b,c,d,e,f,g,h,i,j,k,l where
a = A
b = A sharp
c = B
d = C
e = C sharp
f = D
g = D sharp
h = E
i = F
j = F sharp
k = G
l = G sharp.
This notation would remove the need for sharps and flats
completely but the standard stave would require 7 lines, not 5.
Double/triple sharps and double/triple flats would also be
replaced by just printing the required note on the appropriate
line or space on the 7 line stave.
Just an idea, but it would also greatly increase the number of
words available to make from the notes, along with its
other advantages over the current tired system.

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Re: Spelling with music notes

Post by alpha » Fri Jun 15, 2012 9:08 pm

fredbucket wrote:
Arjuna wrote:The word isn't "Gcaefgbcdca" is it?
Close, but no cigar.

There are obviously seven unique letters in the word, but they are not the first seven letters of the alphabet...

Regards
Fred
It appears to be the name of this website...

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