Ideal humidity for a piano

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adamjohnson
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Ideal humidity for a piano

Post by adamjohnson » Thu Jul 27, 2017 10:28 am

Hi all,

First time poster here, so please excuse my indiscretion if I have put this thread in the wrong place!!
more: https://nhacchuongmp3.com/tai-nhac-chuo ... -5412.html

I bought a 1969 Eavestaff Minipiano Royal back in January as I have taken the piano back up after a 20 year hiatus. It's previous home was a south facing room in a 1930's property with central heating where it had been since new. The environment it's living in now is largely the same (albeit quite a drafty room that gets chilly in the winter). So far it seems to have coped very well with the transition and hasn't lost tune since I had it done shortly after purchase 7 months ago. There are no new clicks, squeaks or rattles, even with the temperature going up during the summer (The room is west facing so gets blasted with sun in the evenings, but it is in shade during the day). In fact, the sustain pedal which squeaked a bit when I got it, doesn't anymore.

Obviously these Eavestaff's were fairly mid to low end when they were new, so presumably it may need a little more care than something better made from the same era.

With that in mind, should I be taking any additional steps to ensure it lasts a bit longer (I plan to keep it for at least 3 years before buying something a bit nicer)? I'm thinking specifically about humidity in the room and whether or not I should be monitoring it (and if so, at what level should it ideally be?), and doing anything to adjust it. I've heard of people putting glasses of water inside, although I'm not sure this is necessary in the southern English climate (and indeed, looking at some other posts, may cause more issues than it solves).
more: https://nhacchuongmp3.com/

Thanks in advance!
Last edited by adamjohnson on Fri Jul 28, 2017 10:55 am, edited 1 time in total.
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fredbucket
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Re: Ideal humidity for a piano

Post by fredbucket » Fri Jul 28, 2017 1:02 am

adamjohnson wrote:First time poster here, so please excuse my indiscretion if I have put this thread in the wrong place!!
No, you have positioned it perfectly :-)
adamjohnson wrote:With that in mind, should I be taking any additional steps to ensure it lasts a bit longer
No, I don't believe so. Artificial devices such as Dampp Chasers can actually do more damage than (questionable) good. Pianos expand and contract according to temperature and humidity certainly, but in a home environment as long as the extremes are not that extreme that should not be an issue. My piano sits in my house quite comfortably with no extraneous climate control other than the occasional air conditioning and has had no issues, tuning or otherwise. Pianos do take a while to 'settle in' as it were, but once they do a 'normal' house environment is fine.

Regadrs
Fred

paolor
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Re: Ideal humidity for a piano

Post by paolor » Sat Jul 29, 2017 2:17 pm

I once was told by a professional that 50-60% humidity is perfect for a grand piano, and that it should always be at least 40%, which I ensure (during winter days) by using a humidifier.
Br, paolor

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