More than 2 hands (but NOT 4) on any number of pianos

Piano, Fortepiano and Harpsichord Music
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Jim Faston
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Re: More than 2 hands (but NOT 4) on any number of pianos

Post by Jim Faston »

I just got around to looking at the score - they mislabeled it as symphony 1 when in fact it is number 4. I went to Sibley's page to notify them and see that they have already corrected it. Here's a new link.

http://hdl.handle.net/1802/32932
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fredbucket
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Re: More than 2 hands (but NOT 4) on any number of pianos

Post by fredbucket »

Other arrangements by Robert Keller may be found here...

https://urresearch.rochester.edu/viewCo ... ameId=7173

Regards
Fred
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Re: More than 2 hands (but NOT 4) on any number of pianos

Post by minacciosa »

oren segev wrote: Fri Sep 18, 2009 6:26 pm Chabrier-España 2 oianos-8 hands
Oren

Chabrier-España 2 oianos-8 hands.pdf
I've performed this on a concert comprised solely of 8H2P transcriptions. This one works tremendously well.
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Mouchette
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Re: More than 2 hands (but NOT 4) on any number of pianos

Post by Mouchette »

Hi
I'm looking for Beethoven/Burchard Piano trio op. 1#3, 2P8H. Anyone has it?
M
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Re: More than 2 hands (but NOT 4) on any number of pianos

Post by Liubingbingpiano »

I'm looking for Moritz von Bomhard's "Die Fledermaus Waltzes" Opus 56,does anyone have it?
Many thanks.
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Re: More than 2 hands (but NOT 4) on any number of pianos

Post by lebowl »

I may asked this before but, if so, I forgot the answer. What is the Czerny piece for 6 hands at one piano that has the on purpose funny parts where the person in the middle has to lean way back to get out of the way of the other pianists?
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Re: More than 2 hands (but NOT 4) on any number of pianos

Post by bingo »

lebowl wrote: Sat Aug 21, 2021 11:41 pm I may asked this before but, if so, I forgot the answer. What is the Czerny piece for 6 hands at one piano that has the on purpose funny parts where the person in the middle has to lean way back to get out of the way of the other pianists?
search here on Czerny 1P6H
Mouchette wrote: Thu Oct 08, 2009 4:33 pm Here is Mozart/Czerny Nozze Ouverture 6H. Better. And very funny to play.

Mozart Czerny Ouverture des Noces 1P6H.pdf
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Re: More than 2 hands (but NOT 4) on any number of pianos

Post by bingo »

Liubingbingpiano wrote: Fri Aug 20, 2021 11:59 am I'm looking for Moritz von Bomhard's "Die Fledermaus Waltzes" Opus 56,does anyone have it?
Many thanks.
The Naxos recording notes give some clues as to where to look. University of Louisville library appear to hold some of Bomhard's documents.
The Philharmonic Piano Quartethttps://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Philharmo ... no_Quartet made its public début at a Lewisohn Stadium concert in New York in June 1949. Four pianists playing together must have been quite a spectacle. The reviewer, writing for the New York Times, stated that "the four young pianists brought freshness to their difficult medium, as well as precision, agility and some fairly successful attempts to obtain color contrasts". The four pianists were Ada Kopetz, Bertha Melnik, Max Walmer and John G. Scales. Two months before their first public performance, the Philharmonic Piano Quartet recorded in the 30th Street Studio of Columbia Records a very effective paraphrase on "Die Fledermaus" Waltzes, Op. 56, specially written for them by Moritz von Bomhard (1908-1996). Born in Germany, Bomhard received a law degree from the University of Leipzig and a music degree from the Leipzig Conservatory of Music. He moved to the United States in 1935, continued his studies at Juilliard and became a music instructor at Princeton University, where he also directed its orchestra and glee clubs. He eventually settled in Louisville where he founded Kentucky Opera and taught at the University of Louisville. His transcription for four pianos of Strauss's best known melodies, gives equal time to each of the four pianists to shine, and also combines the four instruments in an amazingly unifying way, giving the impression that there is only one large piano being played. The piece is pure fun.
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Re: More than 2 hands (but NOT 4) on any number of pianos

Post by bingo »

Mouchette wrote: Sun Jul 04, 2021 10:56 am Hi
I'm looking for Beethoven/Burchard Piano trio op. 1#3, 2P8H. Anyone has it?
M
Is Burchard known to have arranged all three of the Op.1 trios? I can only find references to Nos. 1 & 2
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Re: More than 2 hands (but NOT 4) on any number of pianos

Post by Liubingbingpiano »

bingo wrote: Sun Aug 22, 2021 6:14 am
Liubingbingpiano wrote: Fri Aug 20, 2021 11:59 am I'm looking for Moritz von Bomhard's "Die Fledermaus Waltzes" Opus 56,does anyone have it?
Many thanks.
The Naxos recording notes give some clues as to where to look. University of Louisville library appear to hold some of Bomhard's documents.
The Philharmonic Piano Quartethttps://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Philharmo ... no_Quartet made its public début at a Lewisohn Stadium concert in New York in June 1949. Four pianists playing together must have been quite a spectacle. The reviewer, writing for the New York Times, stated that "the four young pianists brought freshness to their difficult medium, as well as precision, agility and some fairly successful attempts to obtain color contrasts". The four pianists were Ada Kopetz, Bertha Melnik, Max Walmer and John G. Scales. Two months before their first public performance, the Philharmonic Piano Quartet recorded in the 30th Street Studio of Columbia Records a very effective paraphrase on "Die Fledermaus" Waltzes, Op. 56, specially written for them by Moritz von Bomhard (1908-1996). Born in Germany, Bomhard received a law degree from the University of Leipzig and a music degree from the Leipzig Conservatory of Music. He moved to the United States in 1935, continued his studies at Juilliard and became a music instructor at Princeton University, where he also directed its orchestra and glee clubs. He eventually settled in Louisville where he founded Kentucky Opera and taught at the University of Louisville. His transcription for four pianos of Strauss's best known melodies, gives equal time to each of the four pianists to shine, and also combines the four instruments in an amazingly unifying way, giving the impression that there is only one large piano being played. The piece is pure fun.
OK.Thanks.
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