Russian & Soviet Composers - Part 3

Piano, Fortepiano and Harpsichord Music
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ilu
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Re: Russian & Soviet Composers - Part 3

Post by ilu » Wed Dec 29, 2010 4:41 pm

Malcolm:

Thank you so much for the Zolotarev’s op 14.

The sonatine in one movement is nice and the scan is good

I appreciate your effort and generosity.

The best for you and all PP2 members in 2011.

Ilu.
Quo melius Illac

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Re: Russian & Soviet Composers - Part 3

Post by isokani » Thu Dec 30, 2010 12:45 am

lutoslawski wrote:MIroslav Skorik - Partita No.5 for Piano.
Own Scans.

Tony
Err. Afraid he's alive but the likelihood of being able to buy this in a shop is extremely remote!

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Re: Russian & Soviet Composers - Part 3

Post by fleubis » Thu Dec 30, 2010 5:49 am

Malcolm, thanks for the Zolotarev. These 3 very excellent pieces will please most any ear. The 3rd one called Etude is really more like a toccata and quite effective, too.

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Re: Russian & Soviet Composers - Part 3

Post by Dani_area_51 » Mon Jan 03, 2011 11:28 pm

I'd like to post here some new scores from sibley, and I believe this is a composer no one has ever talked here.

Aleksandr Chesnokov ( 1880 - 1941 )
Russian composer, Alexander Chesnokov (1880-1941), like his more famous brother, Pavel Chesnokov, specialized in church and choral music; ultimately, however, Alexander chose to emigrate after the 1917 revolution, which, by weakening the Russian Orthodox Church, had closed off one of his main sources of commissions. Chesnokov received his early musical training at the Moscow Synodal School. Having composed his first major work in 1899, he continuedhis musical studies at the St. Petersburg Conservatory, where he remained through 1906. A prolific choir composer,Chesnokov had been a rising star of church music, but following the revolution, he was forced to make ends meet by teaching or conducting state choirs and orchestras. In 1923 he emigrated to Prague, before settling in Paris withits large Russian émigré community. Chesnokov lectured in the Russian Conservatory and taught church singing in the St. Sergius Orthodox Theological Institute in Paris, but, hard pressed for money, he also arranged or wrote light music pieces, sometimes employing the pseudonyms, Al. Daleau or Al. Tchayss. Chesnokov worked on his own more serious compositions during his spare time, including the Requiem of the Mystery of Death, or, The Russian Requiem, which honored graduates of the St. Petersburg Conservatory. Very little of what he wrote during that difficult period has been preserved, but he did manage to send a copy of the completed Requiem to his brother in Moscow. That work received a posthumous performance in theRussian capitol during the 1990s. Alexander Chesnokov remained in France until his death and is buried near Paris.

Trois préludes pour piano. Op. 2
https://urresearch.rochester.edu/instit ... onId=13224

Variations sur le thême du chant russe "Korobotchka". Pour piano. Op. 4
https://urresearch.rochester.edu/instit ... onId=13225

Six morceaux pour piano. Op. 6
https://urresearch.rochester.edu/instit ... onId=13223

Suite, "les esquises du jour" : op. 7 pour piano.
https://urresearch.rochester.edu/instit ... onId=11344

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Re: Russian & Soviet Composers - Part 3

Post by mballan » Fri Jan 07, 2011 8:45 pm

Just a small non-opus work by Aleksandrov (1883 - 1946) for children. Hopefully something far more major by Aleksandrov tomorrow.

Malcolm

Six Easy Pieces (1948)
Aleksandrov A - Six Easy Pieces (1948).pdf
1. Drizzling Rain Shower
2. New Year’s Polka
3. When you are little
4. Bearing dancing to a Flute
5. Waltz
6. Song
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Re: Russian & Soviet Composers - Part 3

Post by mballan » Sun Jan 09, 2011 8:46 am

As promised, another work by Aleksandrov, although, this is for two pianos.

Malcolm

Three Fragments from the opera "Bela" for Two Pianos
Aleksandrov A - Three Fragments from the opera 'Bela' arr. Two Pianos.pdf
1. Prelude to the 5th scene
2. Sunrise
3. Prelude to 7th scene
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Re: Russian & Soviet Composers - Part 3

Post by lutoslawski » Sun Jan 09, 2011 2:40 pm

mballan wrote:As promised, another work by Aleksandrov, although, this is for two pianos.

Malcolm

Three Fragments from the opera "Bela" for Two Pianos
Aleksandrov A - Three Fragments from the opera 'Bela' arr. Two Pianos.pdf
1. Prelude to the 5th scene
2. Sunrise
3. Prelude to 7th scene
Ahh This shall be fun. Thank you.

Tony

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Re: Russian & Soviet Composers - Part 3

Post by mballan » Mon Jan 10, 2011 8:55 am

Unfortunately, I've just discovered that the Russian composer, Boris Tishchenko, died in December. Boris Ivanovich was born in 1939 in Leningrad and studied composition with Salmanov, Voloshinov and Yevlakhov, plus piano with Logovinsky at the Leningrad Conservatoire. He graduated as a composer in 1962, and as a pianist in 1963. He also did post-grad work there with Shostkovich from 1962-65. Tishchenko's music is concentrated, intense and expressive....his finest works are those for orchestra, in which he continues, the Shostakovich's tradition. He also wrote an excellent series of piano sonatas, one of which was posted by Alfor [some of the others are available through the publisher, Sikorski].

In his memory, I have posted his opus 11 fable for piano, "The Muleteer's Donkey [although a straight translation of the Russian would suggest "The Muleteer's Ass"]!!
Tishchenko B - Op 11 'The Muleteer's Donkey' A Fable for piano.pdf
Malcolm
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Re: Russian & Soviet Composers - Part 3

Post by fleubis » Mon Jan 10, 2011 5:52 pm

mballan wrote:As promised, another work by Aleksandrov, although, this is for two pianos.

Malcolm

Three Fragments from the opera "Bela" for Two Pianos
Aleksandrov A - Three Fragments from the opera 'Bela' arr. Two Pianos.pdf
1. Prelude to the 5th scene
2. Sunrise
3. Prelude to 7th scene
Ah, Malcolm, what a totally unexpected surprise! This will be fun. Thanks so very much, any Alexandrov is always very welcome.

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Re: Russian & Soviet Composers - Part 3

Post by mballan » Tue Jan 11, 2011 8:14 pm

I have posted a fair number of works by Aleksandr Gedike [Goedicke] (1877 – 1957) in the past on this site [majority now available through the Archive], and recently managed to obtain an album with a number of pieces we do not have. These range from easy pieces aimed at younger players through to more complex, substantial pieces [Op 78 & 101 for example].

Apologies, the score pages were very yellowed but have sought to remove as much as I can whilst scanning, but please be aware there may still be some light shadowing.

Malcolm

Barcarola (1896)
Gedike - Barcarola (1896).pdf
Op 1 No. 2 Petite Valse [from Op 1 Quatre Morceaux]
Gedike - Op 1 No. 2 Petite Valse.pdf
Op 6 No. 5 Piece [Dance from Op 6 Twenty Easy Pieces for Beginners]
Gedike - Op 6 No. 5 Piece.pdf
Op 32 No. 13 Etude, No. 14 Shepgherd’s Horn, No. 37 Mirage, No. 38 Three-part Prelude, No. 40 Thunderstorm [from Op 32 Forty Melodic Etudes for beginners in order of gradual difficulty]
Gedike - Op 32 No. 13 Etude.pdf
Gedike - Op 32 No. 14 Shepherd's Horn.pdf
Gedike - Op 32 No. 37 Mirage.pdf
Gedike - Op 32 No. 38 Three-part Prelude.pdf
Gedike - Op 32 No. 40 Thunderstorm.pdf
Op 46 No. 32 Waltz [from Op 46 Fifty Easy Pieces]
Gedike - Op 46 No. 32 Waltz.pdf
Op 57 No. 17 Conversation & No. 19 Patterns [from Op 57 Twenty Pieces of Easy & Medium Diffiuclty]
Gedike - Op 57 No. 17 Conversation.pdf
Gedike - Op 57 No. 19 Patterns.pdf
Op 59 No. 7 Prelude, No. 18 Fragment & No. 24 Prelude [from Op 59 Twenty-five Pieces]
Gedike - Op 59 No. 7 Prelude.pdf
Gedike - Op 59 No. 18 Fragment.pdf
Gedike - Op 59 No. 24 Prelude.pdf
Op 60 No. 9 Invention & No. 12 Prelude [from Op 60 Fifteen Small Pieces of medium difficulty]
Gedike - Op 60 No. 9 Invention.pdf
Gedike - Op 60 No. 12 Prelude.pdf
Op 78 No. 4 Fragment, & No. 6 Etude [from Op 78 Huit Morceaux]
Gedike - Op 78 No. 4 Fragment.pdf
Gedike - Op 78 No. 6 Etude.pdf
Op 101 No. 3 Octave Etude & No. 9 Etude [from Op 101 Twelve Melodic Etudes]
Gedike - Op 101 No. 3 Octave Etude.pdf
Gedike - Op 101 No. 9 Etude.pdf
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