Music from the Balkans

Piano, Fortepiano and Harpsichord Music
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didi
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Re: Music from the Balkans

Post by didi » Mon Jan 14, 2013 9:48 pm

Dani_area_51 wrote:
alfor wrote:
mballan wrote:tobyjj...I appreciate your point and understand the difficulty in trying to navigate around some of these sites - but I only know a little Russian and nothing of any other languages [and I don't think Alfor knows Russian or the eastern European languages - I'm sure he will correct me if wrong] yet we are able to navigate around these sites. As fleubis kindly states - Google translate is a very useful tool and the one I use for the majority. Yes, it is not always easy and takes a little time and effort, but at the same time you may discover other musical gems that might have been missed. ...Malcolm
You are completely correct! Google translator often is very helpful for me!

There is one quite annoying thing which I do not understand:

Why do all digital files from libraries have a strange mixture of figures and letters and therefore need renaming ????????
More than seconded!
Well anohter issue is that - especially- Rochester likes to split works having been written in opus into several ones.
So we have op x, no.1, op x no.2, op x, no .3 ...

I had an email discussion with them on this issue- they argued that they want to make their scores
available also for persons in third countries with slow Internet.
Since - typically - we speak here of scores of 200k this argumentation is - in my eyes - nonsense.
But I can understand from statistical point of view their splitting of files ....

BR // Didi

Timtin
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Re: Music from the Balkans

Post by Timtin » Mon Jan 14, 2013 9:56 pm

Although we now greatly benefit for the free availability of digitised
scores from several of the great libraries, one thing seems to have
been somewhat overlooked.
This is that from certain libraries, those free downloads are conditional
upon them being for personal use only, and shouldn't be reproduced.
Maybe that isn't enforceable, but to me it seems a courtesy to the
library concerned to abide by any restrictions they may chose to
impose on their files.
File-renaming seems a small price to pay for the freebies on offer.

Timtin
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Re: Music from the Balkans

Post by Timtin » Wed Jan 16, 2013 2:40 pm

Slovenian composer Benjamin Ipavec (1829-1908) seems to have written some
very attractive pieces, including Koncertna Kadrilja Op15, the 9th. work down
the first of four pages of his music available from Slovenia's Digital Library.

http://www.dlib.si/results/?query=%27co ... ageSize=25

The Wikipedia information on him seems a bit sparse.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Benjamin_Ipavec

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FW190
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Post by FW190 » Mon Mar 25, 2013 9:28 am

Dora Pejačević (Pejacsevich) (1885-1923), opus 28, Walzer Capricen Suite, Rózsavölgyi Edition (Budapest), 1913.
Pejacsevich.-.op.28.-.Walzer-Capricen-Suite-(pno-autographed-copy-Rozsavölgy-Edition-1913).pdf
Bio:
http://www.mic.hr/composer/dora/composer_articles/bio

Free scores (excerpts):
http://www.mic.hr/composer/dora/notes
You do not have the required permissions to view the files attached to this post.
In Bach we trust.

thalbergmad
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Re: Music from the Balkans

Post by thalbergmad » Mon Mar 25, 2013 7:33 pm

Nice work old chap. Pejacevic is a bit of a belter.

Thal

remy
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Re:

Post by remy » Tue Mar 26, 2013 9:22 am

FW190 wrote:Dora Pejačević (Pejacsevich) (1885-1923), opus 28, Walzer Capricen Suite, Rózsavölgyi Edition (Budapest), 1913.
Pejacsevich.-.op.28.-.Walzer-Capricen-Suite-(pno-autographed-copy-Rozsavölgy-Edition-1913).pdf
Bio:
http://www.mic.hr/composer/dora/composer_articles/bio

Free scores (excerpts):
http://www.mic.hr/composer/dora/notes
Thanks very much, FW. Great to get another one of Dora's beautiful compositions.


jeremy

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mballan
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Re: Music from the Balkans

Post by mballan » Tue Jul 30, 2013 4:37 pm

Andrey Stoyanov (1890-1969) - brother to Vesselin Stoyanov. He was among the founding members of the Contemporary Music Society (which later became the Union of Bulgarian Composers in 1933). He graduated from the Robert College in Instanbul majoring in piano with Sikac. From 1910 to 1914 he studied piano with Prohazka and music theory with Gredner and Mandichevski at the Music Academy in Vienna. Upon his return to Bulgaria, he taught at the State Music School and from 1922 to 1958 he was Professor at the State Academy of Music in Sofia. In 1950 Stoyanov was elected Chairman of the Piano Department - he is considered one of the founders of the Bulgarian piano school. In 1953 he became Head of the Music Pedagogy Department of the Institute of Music at the Bulgarian Academy of Sciences. He composed piano music; a few chamber works; solo and choral songs.

Although Stoyanov has popped up in various postings and discussions, I think this is the first time one of his works has been posted. Unfortunately the paper was very yellowed and fragile, so I have had to scan this using grayscale. Happy if anyone can optimise this file.

http://www.mediafire.com/view/w9e81on15 ... natina.pdf

Malcolm

Jim Faston
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Re: Music from the Balkans

Post by Jim Faston » Tue Jul 30, 2013 5:21 pm

mballan wrote:Andrey Stoyanov (1890-1969) - brother to Vesselin Stoyanov. He was among the founding members of the Contemporary Music Society (which later became the Union of Bulgarian Composers in 1933). He graduated from the Robert College in Instanbul majoring in piano with Sikac. From 1910 to 1914 he studied piano with Prohazka and music theory with Gredner and Mandichevski at the Music Academy in Vienna. Upon his return to Bulgaria, he taught at the State Music School and from 1922 to 1958 he was Professor at the State Academy of Music in Sofia. In 1950 Stoyanov was elected Chairman of the Piano Department - he is considered one of the founders of the Bulgarian piano school. In 1953 he became Head of the Music Pedagogy Department of the Institute of Music at the Bulgarian Academy of Sciences. He composed piano music; a few chamber works; solo and choral songs.

Although Stoyanov has popped up in various postings and discussions, I think this is the first time one of his works has been posted. Unfortunately the paper was very yellowed and fragile, so I have had to scan this using grayscale. Happy if anyone can optimise this file.

http://www.mediafire.com/view/w9e81on15 ... natina.pdf

Malcolm
Nice piece--thanks Malcolm. Here's a quickly generated B&W version.
Stoyanov_Sonatina.pdf
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fleubis
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Re: Music from the Balkans

Post by fleubis » Wed Jul 31, 2013 12:28 am

Nice piece--thanks Malcolm. Here's a quickly generated B&W version.
Stoyanov_Sonatina.pdf
I sure wish I knew how you did that B&W conversion. I've been struggling with Acrobat Pro for months and still can't figure it out!

Thanks the pristine copy--pure B&W is so much easier on the eyes :D

alfor
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Re: Music from the Balkans

Post by alfor » Tue Oct 08, 2013 11:10 am

Mihail G. ANDRICU

Unfortunately his only piano work in print is a Sonata op. 55. For reasons of pronounciation he changed his last name to „Andrico“ and his first name to „Michel“ when living in France. C.f. Enescu.


nms (rather low-res):
Andricu Suite lyrique op.7.pdf
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Best regards, Alfor S. Cans

Music is a higher revelation than wisdom and philosophy (Beethoven)


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