The Music of Brazil

Piano, Fortepiano and Harpsichord Music
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phikfy
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Re: The Music of Brazil

Post by phikfy » Tue Nov 17, 2015 5:21 am

Mercuzio wrote:Villa Lobos - Bachianas Brasileiras n. 5 - piano solo

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=zIGOzLLzIIU
Bachianas Brasileiras No. 5 (Heitor Villa-Lobos).pdf
Wow! Thanks Mercuzio.

vvedenskij
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Re: The Music of Brazil

Post by vvedenskij » Thu Mar 31, 2016 7:14 pm

... yet another guarnieri dissertation, this one a "performing edition" of the 1961 piano concertino (common sense would suggest that a thesis should be in the public domain [see also note on p. 154] but if there are copyright concerns, please remove ...).
Guarnieri - Concertino for Piano & Chamber Orchestra (1961).pdf
vv.
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Re: The Music of Brazil

Post by Scriabinoff » Thu May 26, 2016 12:32 pm

Pp site search yields no hits for last name Souto.
Eduardo Souto (1882-1942)

Artist Biography by Alvaro Neder
Eduardo Souto composed several hits and was a respected orchestrator and conductor, but along with his musical merits, he must be regarded as a historic figure. Representative of the pre-Cultural Industry period in Brazil, the radio marked the end of his success. Souto, together, with Sinhô, was responsible for the fixation of the genre marchinha de carnaval, 20 years after the seminal "Ô Abre Alas" (Chiquinha Gonzaga). His publishing house released many of the most important pieces of the period and he was a pioneer of the usage of Carnival groups (blocos) for the promotion of his songs (usage that would be substituted, years later, by the radio).

Coming from a rich family, Eduardo Souto learned to play the piano at age six. At 11, he went to Rio de Janeiro RJ, where he took music classes with professor Carlos Darbilly. At 14, he wrote his first valse, "Amorosa," and in 1906, conducted (in public for the first time) the Éden's Club amateur musical group. In 1917, he became the owner of a publishing house at the Rua do Ouvidor. In 1919, he had fame and success with the fado-tango "O Despertar da Montanha." In the same year, he wrote "Seu Delfim Tem Que Vortá" with Norberto Bittencourt. In 1920, he opened the Casa Carlos Gomes music store that definitively projected his name in the artistic scene. Souto also devised the Coral Brasileiro, which had famous members, like Bidu Saião, Nascimento Silva, Zaíra de Oliveira, and others. He also organized several orchestras that participated in the receptions for the Kings of Belgium in their visit to Brazil, in that year. Souto was the artistic director for Odeon and Parlophon. As an orchestrator and conductor of symphonic music, he gave concerts in Rio and São Paulo. His marchinha "Pois Não" (with João da Praia) was, together with Sinhô's "O Pé de Anjo," the one that gave birth to the genre in its fixated form of vast success in the Carnival, 20 years after the seminal and pioneer "Ô Abre Alas" (Chiquinha Gonzaga). The song was a hit in 1920's Carnival and was included in the revue Gato, Baeta, Carapicu (Cardoso de Meneses, Bento Moçurunga, and Bernardino Vivas). In the next year, his chula "Pemberê" (with João da Praia) was a Carnival hit, in Baiano's recording. In 1922, he performed with Cornélio Pires during the commemorations of the Independence centennial and had success with the marchinha "Eu Só Quero É Beliscar." In 1923, he satirized the President Nilo Peçanha with "Só Teu Amor" and "Goiabada." His biggest Carnival hit was "Tatu Subiu No Pau," released in the 1923 Carnival. In the same year, Souto launched his Carnaval group, with the same name, dedicated to promoting his compositions. In 1924, he presented "Não Sei Dizê" and "Pai Adão," and in 1925, "Quando Me Lembro" (with João da Praia). Souto wrote the music of the 1926 revue Ziguezague (together with conductor Antônio Lago), based in a Bastos Tigre original. In 1929, he released two marchinhas about the President Washington Luís: "É, Sim, Senhor," and "Seu Doutor," both recorded by Francisco Alves for Odeon.

His last Carnival hits were the marcha "Batucada" (with João de Barro), recorded by Mário Reis in 1931, and the marcha "Gegê" (with Getúlio Marinho), recorded by Jaime Vogeler in 1932. He wrote the anthem of one of Brazil's biggest soccer clubs, the Botafogo Futebol Clube (Rio). After his demise, his son, the pianist Nelson Souto, recorded an LP with his compositions, featuring his Carnival marches, in 1958.


some nice recordings by pianist Alexandre Dias on hit YT piano (actually a pretty incredible archive of Brazilian piano music, a champion of sorts for this category)
https://www.youtube.com/user/lisztzstil/videos


lots of good PDF scores here, and many are showcased by the pianist above (actually i think he sourced them here)
http://www.eduardosouto.com.br/p/catalo ... turas.html

note there is a google drive download link that gets you all 209 scores (648 mb) in one file. , but the catalog breakdown is useful for the year of 1st edition, type of piece, etc.
Last edited by Scriabinoff on Thu May 26, 2016 12:39 pm, edited 1 time in total.

Jean-Séb
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Re: The Music of Brazil

Post by Jean-Séb » Thu May 26, 2016 12:34 pm

Thank you very much for this post and the associated links. It is great pleasure to hear and to play that sort of music.

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Scriabinoff
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Re: The Music of Brazil

Post by Scriabinoff » Thu May 26, 2016 12:41 pm

Jean-Séb wrote:Thank you very much for this post and the associated links. It is great pleasure to hear and to play that sort of music.
most welcome~! :D just glad my shenanigans and meanderings and wanderings allowed me to stumble across this trove , hope you and others find much enjoyment from discovering and listening (I believe there's other recordings on yt as well, honestly haven't searched much beyond that pianist as i have been preoccupied with listening his channel exclusively lately) :)

kroket
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Re: The Music of Brazil

Post by kroket » Sun Jul 24, 2016 7:28 am

Cantu Jongo.pdf
Levy A. Samba from Suite Bresilienne 4 (2H by L. Levy).pdf
Two dances: a samba and a jongo.
Greetings,
kroket
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Jean-Séb
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Re: The Music of Brazil

Post by Jean-Séb » Sun Jul 24, 2016 8:45 am

Very nice. Thank you Kroket.

fleubis
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Re: The Music of Brazil

Post by fleubis » Mon Jul 25, 2016 12:10 am

Seconded! Now I'll need to investigate the Jongo--yet another dance type new to me. The Portugese note says the ¨jongo theme¨ was danced by blacks in Rio Claro when slavery was abolished. The first fragment invokes the theme of jongo, rising little by little, until the end is in the form of Stretto---as seen by the Piu Mosso, Allegro and Vivace as the piece progresses. Very interesting indeed!

kroket
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Re: The Music of Brazil

Post by kroket » Mon Jul 25, 2016 6:14 am

fleubis wrote:Seconded! Now I'll need to investigate the Jongo--yet another dance type new to me. The Portugese note says the ¨jongo theme¨ was danced by blacks in Rio Claro when slavery was abolished. The first fragment invokes the theme of jongo, rising little by little, until the end is in the form of Stretto---as seen by the Piu Mosso, Allegro and Vivace as the piece progresses. Very interesting indeed!
The Jongo (on piano) I like most is the last part of the Suite Brasileira no. 3 by Oscar Lorenzo Fernandez. That one suits your description of this dance perfectly!
Greetings,
kroket

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Re: The Music of Brazil

Post by kroket » Sat Oct 29, 2016 3:58 pm

Mignone Dansa do botocudo.pdf
One of my (many) favorite pieces by Francisco Mignone.
So much of his music has sadly gone out of print.
This publisher, Mangione, has gone bankrupt years ago.
This piece was kindly scanned by the University of Texas in Austin.
The scan could use some improvement.

Greetings,
kroket
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